KID SHIRT

Saturday, February 05, 2005

THE FUTURE'S NOW

Nick Gutterbreakz on the failure of the Nu Generation of Electro-Pop Futurists to actually sound futuristic: "I spent nearly fifteen years telling anyone who would listen that the synthpop/futurist period circa 1978-82 was ripe for fresh exploration. The ideas behind the likes of The Normal, early Fad Gadget, John Foxx, Visage etc etc etc seemed to me like a massive potential resource for pop's future..."

"(But) Most of the modern electropop I've heard," says Nick, "sounds like a bad joke, a tasteless pastiche, devoid of originality or grace..." Well, I get as irritated and frustrated about this topic as you do, Nick, hence my childishly pointless and immature attempts to kick off a Eastside/Westside style beef with Goldfrapp last year.

Nick points out (quite rightly) that 'Futurism' can never happen again in its original form. That moment has gone; it evaporated in a blur of receding tachyons, dopplershifted down into the bubbling Yes-No Quantal-Substrata of the 13-D Omnihedron that we all inhabit. 1979 is lost to us forever, but it remains as a memory; a single infinitisimally-small facet on the face of an infinitely large jewel. We catch tantalising glimpses of it sometimes, as random folds and creases in Space-Time cause Past, Future and Present to collide and create a Rachel Stevens single...

But sometimes, maybe, we look in the wrong place. Or maybe we're just looking too hard.

It's a Zen proposition, a Koan: Stop Looking, stop listening and you will hear...

You'll hear echoes of that era in the most unexpected of places, in the glacial synth-stomp of Kano's "P's & Q's", or the arthritically-stiff hand-claps on "Mic-Check 1,2"; the nervous analogue flutters of "Ghost Lawns" by The Anti-Pop Consortium; on Alt.Hop LPs and singles by Mike Ladd and Beans and Divine Styler and Company Flow...which all makes a weird kinda sense. After all, didn't Hip-Hop accept the baton in the early Eighties and temporarily Smurf-morph into Electro? So there's a lineage, of sorts, here that reaches back (via UKG and Brit-Hop and Streetsounds compilations) from Roll Deep to Fad Gadget.

The Future's still Here.

It never went away.

MENTAL METAL

Seems like I'm in the latest (feb) ish of Terrorizer magazine w/ a short-but-sweet review of Shit & Shine/Acid Mothers Temple. Wow, three dif. things by me currently available in WH Smith...

In a parallel universe that could almost be mistaken for a career. Yeah, riiiight.

Bring on the WWF Wrestling Magazines, man: I'm ready.